In the News

September 15, 2017

The office of Sen. Holly Mitchell reports that Mitchell has received the Legislator of the Year award by the California chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) California for "making mental health a priority." The organization also says Mitchell has "tackled tough conversations around mental health, and championed legislation not only reducing stigma surrounding mental illness but also providing access to health care for those that need it most." Contact: Ray Sotero 916 651-4030.

September 15, 2017

SACRAMENTO – Arrest records will be sealed and barriers to employment and housing will be removed for those arrested but not convicted of a crime, the California Assembly legislated Thursday, September 14.

The Assembly approved Senate Bill 393, the Consumer Arrest Record Equity (CARE) Act, is part of the #EquityAndJustice package of bills jointly authored by Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) and Sen. Holly Mitchell (D-Los Angeles) to promote prevention, rehabilitation and maintain family cohesion.

September 14, 2017

By Holly J. Mitchell and Alex Johnson

When a child commits a crime, we cannot give up on him or her. Our laws, our morality, demand that we respond in a manner that will help the child grow into a productive member of our community.

As a California state senator and president of the Los Angeles County Board of Education, respectively, we have spoken to youth who have been detained and placed on juvenile probation. We have met with families whose children have gone through the system. We have visited juvenile facilities across the state.

September 14, 2017

The California Assembly approved Senate Bill 393, the Consumer Arrest Record Equity Act, to seal arrest records and remove barriers to employment and housing for those arrested but not convicted of a crime. The CARE Act is sponsored by San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón.

Senate Bill 393 is part of the #EquityAndJustice bill package of bills jointly authored by Senator Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) and Senator Holly Mitchell (D-Los Angeles) to promote prevention, rehabilitation and maintain family cohesion.

September 13, 2017

Racial Justice and Drug Policy Reform Groups Win Rare Change Through Legislature

Sacramento, CA— Today, the California State Assembly passed a bill to repeal sentence enhancements for prior drug convictions by 41 to 25 vote. Senate Bill 180, authored by Senator Holly Mitchell of Los Angeles and Ricardo Lara of Long Beach, repeals a three-year sentence enhancement for prior drug convictions, including petty drug sales and possession of drugs for sales.

The bill passed the State Senate in June, and now goes to Governor Brown for his signature or veto.

September 13, 2017

Democrats who control California’s Legislature are continuing their efforts to ease criminal penalties, including voting to end a punishment critics call a relic from the nation’s failed war on drugs.

The Assembly on Tuesday gave final approval to a bill that would eliminate allowing judges to impose an additional three-year sentence on repeat drug offenders.

Democratic Sen. Holly Mitchell of Los Angeles, who co-authored SB180, says officials should concentrate on prevention and rehabilitation.

September 13, 2017

Link to original story HERE:

By Mariya Khan 

September 12, 2017

By Jazmine Ulloa

A state Senate bill headed to Gov. Jerry Brown would reduce sentence enhancements for some low-level, nonviolent drug offenses, part of a push by Democratic legislators to help young people facing charges or doing time in California.

Under current state law, a person convicted for sale or possession for sale of a small amount of drugs can face a sentence of three to five years behind bars, plus an additional three years in jail for each prior conviction for similar drug offenses. 

September 12, 2017

Democrats who control California’s Legislature are continuing their efforts to ease criminal penalties, including voting to end a punishment critics call a relic from the nation’s failed war on drugs.

The Assembly on Tuesday gave final approval to a bill that would eliminate allowing judges to impose an additional three-year sentence on repeat drug offenders.

Democratic Sen. Holly Mitchell of Los Angeles, who co-authored SB180, says officials should concentrate instead on prevention and rehabilitation.